Used to Do Discuss Past Habits An Effective Business English Guide

Used to Do: Discuss Past Habits An Effective Business English Guide

The phrase “used to do” is a very useful expression in English when referring to past habits and routines. This phrase can be used to discuss past habits and activities in both personal and professional contexts.
 
In this blog post, we will explore the meaning of the phrase “used to do”, provide examples of how to use it, and present a few helpful business English phrases to help adults learning English improve their understanding and usage of this phrase.
 
 
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Defining “used to do”

 
The phrase “used to do” is a common expression in English that is used to refer to past habits and routines. It indicates that something was done regularly or repeatedly in the past, but is no longer the case. It can be used to talk about personal habits, such as “I used to go for a run every morning”, or professional routines, like “We used to have weekly team meetings on Fridays.”
 
The structure of “used to do” is quite simple. It consists of the subject followed by “used to” and the base form of the verb. For example, “She used to play the piano” or “They used to live in the city.”
 
It is important to note that “used to” is only used to talk about past habits or routines, not for past events or situations. For example, we would say “I used to eat a lot of junk food” (habit) but not “I used to eat pizza last night” (event).
 
By understanding and using the phrase “used to do” correctly, you can effectively communicate about past habits and routines in both personal and professional contexts. It is a valuable tool for expressing yourself in English and will help you improve your fluency and accuracy in the language.
 
 
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Examples of “used to do” to discuss past habits

 
Now that we understand the meaning and structure of “used to do”, let’s look at some examples of how it can be used to describe past habits.
 
1. “I used to eat breakfast every morning, but now I just have a cup of coffee.”
 
2. “He used to smoke cigarettes, but he quit two years ago.”
 
3. “They used to take vacations together every summer, but they haven’t been able to recently.”
 
4. “We used to have a weekly game night with friends, but life got too busy.”
 
5. “She used to practice the guitar for hours every day, but now she hardly plays.”
 
In each of these examples, “used to do” is used to talk about something that was done regularly or repeatedly in the past but is no longer the case. It helps convey the idea of a past habit or routine that has changed over time.
 
Remember, “used to do” is not used for past events or situations. It specifically refers to past habits or routines. So, if you want to talk about something that happened once in the past, you would use different verb forms.
 
By incorporating these examples into your vocabulary, you’ll be able to confidently discuss past habits and routines using the phrase “used to do”.
 
 
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Common business phrases using “used to do” to discuss past habits

 
In the professional world, it’s important to be able to discuss past habits and routines in English. The phrase “used to do” is a useful expression for this purpose. Here are some common business phrases using “used to do” that will help you communicate effectively in a professional context:
 
1. “We used to have monthly meetings, but now we have them weekly.”
 
2. “He used to work late every night, but now he leaves on time.”
 
3. “The company used to offer flexible work hours, but that policy has changed.”
 
4. “She used to manage the sales team, but now she focuses on marketing.”
 
5. “Our team used to use a different project management tool, but we switched to a new one.”
 
These phrases demonstrate how “used to do” can be used to discuss past habits and routines within a business setting. By incorporating these phrases into your vocabulary, you’ll be able to confidently talk about changes and past practices in your professional life. Practice using these phrases in conversations and written communication to improve your fluency and accuracy in business English.
 
 
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Practice exercises for using “used to do” to discuss past habits

 
Now that we have learned about the phrase “used to do” and how it can be used in both personal and professional contexts, it’s time to practice using it in business English conversations.
 

Here are some exercises to help you incorporate “used to do” into your spoken and written communication:

 
1. Imagine you are discussing a past routine with a colleague. Practice using “used to do” to describe what you and your team used to do on a regular basis. For example, “We used to have weekly brainstorming sessions on Wednesdays to generate new ideas.”
 
2. Write a short email to your manager describing a change in a work routine. Use “used to do” to explain what used to happen and how it has changed. For instance, “We used to have quarterly performance reviews, but now we have shifted to a monthly feedback system.”
 
3. Role-play a conversation with a client or coworker about a previous company policy or practice. Use “used to do” to explain what the policy or practice was and why it has changed. Practice phrases like, “We used to offer a 30-day return policy, but we have recently implemented a 14-day return policy due to customer feedback.”
 
4. Create a dialogue with a colleague about a former colleague who had a unique work habit. Use “used to do” to describe the habit and discuss its impact on the team. For example, “Sarah used to bring homemade treats for everyone every Friday, and it really boosted team morale.”
 
By practicing these exercises, you will become more comfortable and fluent in using “used to do” in business English conversations. Remember to pay attention to verb tense and structure to ensure accuracy in your communication.
 
Keep practicing and incorporating this phrase into your everyday language to improve your fluency and proficiency in business English.
 
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Spoken and written communication when you discuss past Habits

 
Now that you understand the meaning and structure of “used to do”, here are some tips to help you master its use in spoken and written communication.
 
Firstly, make sure you are using the correct verb tense. “Used to do” is specifically used to talk about past habits and routines, so the verb should always be in the base form. Avoid using past tense verbs with “used to”, as it can lead to confusion.
 
Secondly, pay attention to the context in which you are using “used to do”. It is important to use this phrase when discussing past habits or routines, not for past events or situations. Double-check your sentence to ensure it aligns with the intended meaning of discussing a regular or repeated action from the past.
 
Additionally, practice using “used to do” in various scenarios. The more you incorporate it into your conversations and written communication, the more comfortable and confident you will become in using it. Consider using the provided exercises to practice using “used to do” in business English conversations.
 
Lastly, listen to native English speakers and read materials that use “used to do” in context. This will help you become more familiar with the phrase and its usage, allowing you to integrate it seamlessly into your own language skills.
 
By following these tips, you will be well on your way to mastering the use of “used to do” in spoken and written communication. Keep practicing and incorporating this phrase into your everyday language to improve your fluency and proficiency in English.
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1 thoughts on “Used to Do: Discuss Past Habits An Effective Business English Guide

  1. Pingback: What Exactly Does the Speaker of the House Do in English Government? | Learn Laugh Speak

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