English Metaphors Explained For Students

English Metaphors Explained With Examples Of Usage

English Metaphors Explained With Examples Of Usage

What is a metaphor? Metaphors are phrases that directly compare two things that are not alike. They are also called similes.
 
In today’s English language, metaphors are usually introduced with “as” or “like.” A metaphor compares one thing to another by saying it is something else or has qualities like another thing.
 
For example, a sentence might say, “The sky was purple and orange.” You might know that the sky doesn’t have color, so this sentence is using a metaphor to tell you how the sky looked.
 
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Metaphors are often used to describe emotions or states of mind. For example, you might say, “I’m so angry I could explode.” This is a metaphor that means you’re very angry.
 
Metaphors can also be used to describe people or personality traits. For example, you might say, “She’s a tiger in the courtroom.” This means she’s fierce and aggressive when she’s fighting for her clients.
 
Metaphors are a way of describing something by using something else that it is similar to. They can be used to make descriptions more interesting or to help explain complex ideas.
 

What is a Metaphor?

 
A metaphor is a figure of speech that uses one thing to represent another. It can be used to make a comparison between two unlike things or to describe something in a more creative way.
 
For example, “The world is my oyster” is a metaphor that means the world is full of opportunity. “She has a heart of gold” is another metaphor which means she is kind and caring.
 
Metaphors can be found in all types of writing, from songs and poems to novels and plays. They are often used to make descriptions more interesting or to help readers understand an idea in a new way.
 
 

Types of Metaphors

 
Metaphors are a figure of speech that are used to make comparisons between two things that are not alike. Metaphors can be used to make a point, to emphasize a feeling, or to add color to writing. There are four main types of metaphors:
 
1. Analogies
Analogies are metaphors that use “like” or “as” to compare two things. For example, you might say “he’s as sly as a fox.” Analogies can be helpful in explaining complex concepts.
 
2. Implied Metaphors 
An implied metaphor is when a comparison is not directly stated, but it is understood. For example, if you say “the world is your oyster,” you are implying that there are many opportunities available to you.
 
3. Personification 
Personification is when an inanimate object or concept is given human qualities. For example, you might say “the wind was howling for hours this morning.”
 
4. Absolute Metaphors 
An absolute metaphor is one where the comparison is made without using like or as. For example, “you are what you eat.”
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How to use Metaphors in English

 
When speaking English, metaphors can be used to add color and life to your language. Metaphors are figures of speech that describe one thing in terms of another, and they can be used to make your English more interesting and engaging.
 
To use a metaphor, you simply need to describe one thing as if it were something else. For example, you could say “The sky is crying” to describe the weather. This is a metaphor because the sky is not actually crying, but it’s a way of describing the rain.
 
Another example of a metaphor would be saying “My heart is aching” to describe how you feel after a breakup. Again, this is not literally true, but it’s a way of describing the pain you’re feeling.
 
If you’re not sure how to use metaphors in English, don’t worry! Just start by listening for them when others speak. Once you get a feel for how they work, try using them yourself in conversation. With a little practice, you’ll be using metaphors like a native speaker in no time!
 
 

Examples of Usage

 
Metaphors are a common literary device used in English, and they can be found in all types of writing. A metaphor is a figure of speech that compares two unlike things without using the word “like” or “as.” For example, if someone says “she’s a diamond,” they are not saying that she is literally a piece of jewelry. Rather, they are saying that she is valuable, rare, and beautiful.
 
There are many different types of metaphors, and they can be used to express all sorts of ideas. In this article, we will explore some common English metaphors and explain what they mean. We will also provide examples of how to use them in sentences.

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A common type of metaphor is the simile. A simile is a figure of speech that compares two things using the words “like” or “as.” For example, if someone says “he’s as strong as an ox,” they are comparing him to an animal that is known for its strength.
 
 
Another type of metaphor is the personification. This is when an inanimate object or concept is given human qualities. For example, if someone says “the sun was smiling down on me,” they are giving the sun the human quality of happiness.
 

Thank you for reading!

This was written by me. Bryce Purnell, founder of Learn Laugh Speak.

Check out more on my Medium or send me an email if you’re ever curious about anything at all 

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