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B1 Level: Simple English Levels Explained

The B1 level of the International Common European Framework of Reference for Languages ( CEFR ) is the level that most students aim for and achieve. Did you know that it was created by a linguist and not a teacher? Did you know that it makes little sense without the B2? Do you know what in-class activities are commonly used to teach grammar at this level? You’re about to find out.

A European Commission’s draft guideline on the relationship between language examinations and the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages ??(CEFR) was published in 2003. The framework was developed by the European Commission within the framework of “Learning Languages ??for European Citizens” project between 1989 to 1996.

There is not always light

In light of advances in this area, in particular with regard to CEFR, other levels have been developed for some languages. These skill levels are one source of the six-level CEFR scale. Below is a guide outlining the number of hours of study required to achieve each CEFR level.

What it represents the levels and why

These headings represent skill levels in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages ??(CEFR for short) and are used by language learners to measure their language proficiency. Language learners use CEFR levels to self-assess so they can more clearly define what they need to do and do, and what they hope to achieve in the language they are learning. Language learners often inadvertently use levels to explain their ability to speak, read, write and understand language.

Giving teachers a guide to follow is essential

Because CEFR is international, it is very helpful for language learners and teachers to talk about levels. CEFR levels are an essential tool in more informal language learning environments or if you are learning languages ??because you enjoy them. CEFR provides a comprehensive description of what learners need to use the language to communicate effectively.

Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Basic language and strategies can be used to support a conversation or discussion. Thoughts on more abstract cultural topics such as i! movies, books, music, etc. can be expressed, you can use a variety of simple languages ??to handle most situations you may encounter while traveling.

Keep it simple

Can communicate in simple, routine tasks using simple sentences to ask and provide information, receive simple information, and discuss what to do next. Can communicate in a simple way if the other person speaks slowly and clearly and is willing to help. Can jump into a discussion on a familiar topic using the right phrase to get an i! oo.

https://t.me/learnlaughspeak I can understand the main points of clear and standard language related to familiar topics. Can understand the content of most recorded or broadcast audio material on topics of personal interest expressed in clear standard speech. \

Can understand direct factual information on common everyday or work topics, identifying both general and specific messages! c details, provided that the speech is clearly articulated with a well-known accent. For example, B1 students can provide descriptions on various familiar topics related to their interests.

The English Levels Explained

Our fun and effective French courses are aimed at those who, according to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, demonstrate a level of English from Pre A1 to C2. During the course, we will help determine your level of English proficiency in accordance with the CEFR (Common European Framework of Refer

If you are not entirely sure of your level, you can download the Council of Europe Self-Assessment Grid and the list of A1 and A2 level descriptors from the European Language Portfolio (ELP). The six reference levels (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2) are widely accepted as the European standard for assessing individual language skills.

It defines skill levels that measure student progress at every stage of learning and on an ongoing basis. The Common European Framework divides students into three main divisions, which can be divided into two levels; for each level, it describes what the student must be able to read, listen, speak and write.

The CEFR Foreign Language Proficiency Scales are accompanied by a detailed analysis of the contexts, topics, tasks and goals of communication, as well as scaled descriptions of the skills that we rely on when communicating. Council of Europe levels Description C2 Proficiency level The ability to deal with academic or cognitively complex material and use language successfully at a level that may be in some respects more advanced than that of the average native speaker. We cannot always guarantee a C1/C2 class during your stay.

If you are not entirely sure of your level, you can download the Council of Europe Self-Assessment Grid and the list of A1 and A2 level descriptors from the European Language Portfolio (ELP). The six reference levels (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2) are widely accepted as the European standard for assessing individual language skills.

Level Achievable after … hours of training Total hours of training

  • A1 80 to 100 hours 80 to 100 hours
  • A2 + 100 to 120 hours 180 to 200 hours
  • B1 + 150 to 180 hours 350 to 400 hours
  • B2 + 200 to 250 hours 600 to 650 h
  • C1 + 250 to 300 h 850 to 900 h
  • C2 To reach this level, the hourly volume varies.

The B1 level of CEFR is undoubtedly the most frequently studied level, and after reading this article, you should have an idea of why that is. From in-class resources to learning activities, grammar has a lot to do with the B1 level. Hopefully, you’ve found this article informative and have learned something new along the way.

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